This page was last updated on:    Thursday, May 17, 2012             
IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER: We would like to announce that the ad for our company in 2012 Alberta Seniors Directory published by Cedar Publishing of Edmonton, Alberta, inclorrectly advertises our services under "Driving School" Category. We are not associated with any driving school, nor do we provide any driver education services. We apologize for the inconvenience this may cause.

A L B E R T A  
DRIVER RISK ASSESSMENT SPECIALISTS

phone: 1 - 403-830-1351
MAXIMUM EFFICIENCY FOR DRIVING SAFETY BUDGET
 
 

PATTY RANDALLS'S WEBSITE
http://www.longtermcarecanada.com
Find information on caring for aging parents or planning for your own care-years.
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Care to Share Senior Services Inc
http://www.caretoshare.ca
Contact us today to arrange a meeting to formulate a care plan for you or your loved ones
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SENIOR DRIVERS SAFETY
Helpful Senior Driver Tips
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DO YOU HAVE A PRODUCT OR SERVICE THAT IS RELEVANT TO THE CONTENT OF THIS PAGE? Contact us to advertise here!
IMPORTANT RESOURCES
Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA)
VISIT WEBSITE
Driver Fitness and Monitoring
Main Floor, Twin Atria Building
Alberta Transportation
4999 - 98 Avenue
Edmonton, AB T6B 2X3
Ph: 780- 427-8230 (toll free in Alberta 310-0000)
Fax: 780- 422-6612


DRIVING AFTER STROKE
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MEDICAL STANDARDS
MEDICAL STANDARDS FOR DRIVERS:
CANADIAN COUNCIL OF MOTOR TRANSPORT ADMINISTRATORS 2009
>>(READ WHOLE DOCUMENT)<< OR >>READ THE BRIEF SUMMARY<<
Dementia is a clinical term describing what is usually a progressive and irreversible impairment of memory, intellect, and personality and is most commonly due to degenerative cerebral disease or multiple strokes. Dementia must be differentiated from conditions causing cognitive impairment which are treatable, reversible, or non-progressive. Factors in determining degree of Dementia include:

Some Memory Impairment but Dementia Not
Definitively Diagnosed
Mild Dementia
Moderate
Dementia
Severe Dementia
- forgets name, location
of objects
- may have trouble
finding words
- may have difficulty
traveling to new locations
- may have difficulty
with problems at work
- Has difficulty
with complex tasks
or instrumental
activities of daily
living (eg finances,
shopping, planning
dinner, cooking,
taking medication,
telephoning etc.)
- Has difficulty with
basics activities of
daily living (eg
eating, dressing
hygiene)
- Needs help
choosing and putting
on clothing
- Requires
prompting and
assistance when
bathing

- Decreased ability
to use toilet and is
incontinent
- Vocabulary
limited
- Loses ability to
walk and sit
- Unable to smile

There is no single clinical test or measurement which correlates with the ability of an individual with dementia to safely operate a motor vehicle. There is, however, a general correlation between driving ability and degree of functional impairment. The driver with evidence of memory impairment(dementia may not have yet been definitely diagnosed) or with mild dementia (defined as having difficulty with complex tasks such as managing finances, shopping, taking medication, cooking) may be able to drive a private vehicle.

This is best determined by performing a professional assessment of driving ability. Such drivers should be reassessed annually because of the progressive nature of most dementing illnesses. Once an individual has progressed to moderate dementia (difficulty with basic activities of daily living such as eating, dressing, and hygiene, OR severe cognitive impairment on formal testing such as MMSE score < 15), the degree of cognitive impairment is sufficient to preclude safe operation of any motor vehicle.

STANDARD: MEMORY IMPAIRMENT OR MILD DEMENTIA – ELIGIBLE FOR CLASS 5 LICENCE, SUBJECT TO SATISFACTORY DRIVING ASSESSMENT. ANNUAL REASSESSMENT IS RECOMMENDED.
MODERATE OR SEVERE DEMENTIA – INELIGIBLE FOR ANY CLASS OF LICENCE

RESTRAINT SYSTEM EXEMPTIONS

15.1 Medical Conditions Warranting Exemptions
15.1.1 Seat Belts and Motorcyclist Helmets
The medical profession in Canada has declared itself unequivocally in favour of the use of
restraint systems in all motor vehicles at all times by drivers and passengers. (CMA 20.1)
There are no medical or physical conditions that call for exemption from using seat belts
(CMA 21.4) or helmets for motorcyclists.

Medical Conditions That May Affect Safe Driving

Medical advisors and administrators from all Canadian provincial and territorial driver-licensing bodies developed the medical standards used in Alberta. Alberta Transportation is responsible for determining driver fitness and making decisions regarding a person’s privilege to drive.
  1. Vision (e.g. minimum correct vision, double vision, telescopic lenses)

  2. Hearing (e.g. vertigo, issues particular to commercial drivers)

  3. Cardiovascular Diseases (e.g. heart disease, heart attack)

  4. Cerebrovascular Diseases (e.g. stroke)

  5. Peripheral Vascular Diseases (e.g. aneurysm and veins)

  6. Diseases of the Nervous System (e.g. seizures, sleep disorders, dementia)

  7. Respiratory Diseases (e.g. lungs)

  8. Metabolic Diseases (e.g. diabetes, parathyroid, pituitary, adrenal)

  9. Renal Diseases (e.g. kidney)

  10. Musculoskeletal Disabilities (e.g. arms, legs, spine, paraplegia, quadraplegia)

  11. Psychiatric Disorders (e.g. mental, emotional, personality, psychotic)

  12. The Effects of Drugs (e.g. sedatives, tranquillizers, antidepressants, narcotics)

  13. The Effects of Alcohol (e.g. alcohol dependency)

  14. Aging Issues (e.g. loss of strength, slow reaction time, lack of attention, poor judgement, confusion, progressive dementia)



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WE ACCEPT CREDIT CARDS!


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